New Male Birth Control Could Change The Way Male Birth Control Works

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Researchers are working on a new form of male contraceptive that’s actually reversible and effective. Looks like sexism is gonna go away from the contraceptive industry too.

 

Researchers are working on a new form of male contraceptive that’s actually reversible and effective.

Female birth control pills have been available in the market since 1960 but there are no such options when it comes to men.

Past attempts at creating a strong hormonal contraceptive with fewer side effects have failed.

But a new study may change things forever as it offers a remedy which deals with sperm instead of hormones.

Since ancient times men have relied on a number of contraceptive methods like lunar calendar, condoms, the pull-out method, etc. with different rates of success. But sadly, scientists are yet to develop a viable option for men even though birth control pills for women have been in the market for more than 50 years. Currently, researchers are trying to develop a male contraceptive pill that stops your sperm from swimming.


According to a study in the journal PLOS ONE, this potential form of birth control uses a chemical compound called EP055 to make sperm slower, and therefore less likely to implant an egg.

Researchers tested the compound by injecting macaque monkeys with high and low doses. In the case of monkeys who took the higher doses of the compound the sperm mobility decreased by 20% which is significant as per Michael O’Rand, a retired professor of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s School of Medicine. O’Rand also serves as president and CEO of Eppin Pharma, Inc., which provided some funding for the study. The compound EP055 worked even at low doses ( the sperm was subfertile at low doses which means fewer chances of successful conception).
“Simply put, the compound turns off the sperm’s ability to swim, significantly limiting fertilization capabilities,” O’Rand, a retired professor of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s School of Medicine, said in a statement.

The even better news is that after 18 days of taking the compound, the monkey’s sperm had normal mobility once again. This is a good sign that EP055 is reversible and won’t have any long-term impact on male fertility, the authors write. But it’s important to know that the study was done on male monkeys and not on humans so it’s not clear how would the compound work on humans. But, researchers are positive this could the change the way people take contraceptives.

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